Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently NINE great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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1958 Excellent Restored Leaf Green 1275 Bugeye Sprite for sale, “Luigi!”
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1959 Austin Healey Sprite, restored with automatic transmission! NEW VIDEO Test drive!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite For sale: Best of the Best!
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1959 Custom 5-speed Austin Healey Bugeye Sprite for sale!
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1959 Restored Bugeye Sprite for sale- VIDEO @ 70MPH! Five-speed, 1275 engine, disc brakes, wire wheels and more!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite driving project for sale!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale-The Bees Knees!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale, exceptional and beautifully restored!
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1974 MGB GT for sale- One of the best values in classic cars today!
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1978 911 SC Targa for sale with 65k miles!
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Excellent 1960 Austin Healey 3000 Mark 1 BT7 for sale

1959 Bugeye Sprite For sale: Best of the Best!

I drove this Bugeye recently and it was flawless. Really. I don’t say that lightly. EVERY British car has a punch list, even if it’s a small one.

Not this one.

The car is awesome. Everything works. It drives right. It’s fun. It goes. It handles. And it looks great. The new owner is going to get one of the best Bugeyes money can buy.

This 1959 Sprite (AN5L 14380) which we call “Crane” was exceptional when we sold it to the current owner a few years ago, an excellent rotisserie restoration that we fully sorted and tastefully upgraded to that owner’s taste. For him we added electronic ignition, spin-on oil filter kit, new tires, three point retractable seat belts, an improved engine cooling fan and he even had us ceramic coat the already deluxe stainless steel exhaust header. But it’s what happened next that makes this car so special.

That owner, (Crane), is THE guy you want to purchase a car from… forget what he asked us to do to make the car great, which included upgrading the engine with a 1098 head with better performance and new valves, springs and hardened valve seats. (We also put on completely restored larger HS2 carbs, a great upgrade from later Sprites.) These are wonderful upgrades. But that was just the beginning.

Once he got it, Crane lavished on this little Sprite every indulgence one could offer a four-wheeled vehicle. The car was stored in a what amounts to a museum, the seats were covered with stay fast protective covers made for him when he purchased the car, and I don’t think they have seen any UV light since the car last left our shop.

This car’s dermatologist would be proud.

One chronic issue with Bugeyes is a small arc of scratches on the back that usually result from the convertible top chafing this area. While this was fine in 1959, it is not the way Crane rolls, so he had a piece of clear plastic invisible clear BRA strategically applied to the back deck, to make a nifty protective layer between convertible top and painted surface. It’s perfectly executed.

Top and windows are new BTW, and come in their own fleece-lined pouches. So does the top bow, if you prefer to stow it in your garage. You can see the protective pouches for top bow, side curtains and top in the slideshow below.

He powdercoated the rims too, and these are some of the nicest original Sprite steel wheels I had ever seen, with not a single mark.

When you run your hand along the finish of this car you can tell it has something different going on, Crane hired the worlds’ finest detailer and I don’t know how many hours he must have spent but the car feels like it is sufficiently protected to last into the next millennium. That detailers receipt is included… he spent more time detailing the windshield glass than most people spend on their entire car. And it looks that good.

This is a 948CC drum brake four-speed equipped old English white car with the “Crane Package,” which means it was given everything and anything to make it absolutely one of the nicest and cleanest examples you will ever see of the 1959 Bugeye Sprite. Even the top bow has been preserved in a protective case Crane had us make, so it could live in his garage without getting blemished.

You get the idea. This car is not for everyone, but only for the person who wants the best of the best.


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Why this major artery can fail and kill your Bugeye Sprite

On all Spridgets, the oil pressure gauge is mechanical and thus it is very important that you know that the feed line for the gauge is in perfect shape. Why? Because if it fails, your car will bleed-out. This is a major artery and your oil pump will spill all your sump’s contents on the street (ask me how I know). It makes a huge mess too, under your hood and all over the road.

The artery in question runs from the engine block to a short rubber hose. That hose runs to a long metal line that feeds the gauge. On many cars we see, pieces are missing and/or the rubber is cracked and dried-out. So the most basic repair is to replace the rubber with fresh rubber that is good and strong. Please check yours today!

You can find the rubber for sale online, but it comes with super lame clamps and in which I have no confidence, particularly for my car’s carotid artery. We sell a rubber hose with clamps you can believe-in as you blast out of a corner with your foot to the floor.

Next you have to make sure the metal lines in your car have the correct barbs to give the rubber line something to capture so it will stay put. You’d be amazed how many of these little rubber lines will simply pull off their metal mates because the barb is long gone. We test them all on the cars that come through our shop. You’d be surprised how many are loose and close to letting go.

In our catalog, we are at work daily to find solutions that will keep these cars on the road with greater reliability. We now sell a new kit to ensure that your artery is healthy. Our fittings help ensure the rubber piece will stay put.

Want to guarantee better Bugeye blood flow? Click here to visit our catalog.

1959 Austin Healey Sprite, restored with automatic transmission! NEW VIDEO Test drive!

This is a Bugeye we call “Scarlett,” (AN5L 9824). If you are a purist, then this car is not for you. But if you love Bugeyes and need an automatic transmission (for whatever reason), this car is the greatest thing going, and it could be the ticket to a Bugeye in your life that otherwise would not have been possible.

Over the years, we have met quite a few people who could not operate a manual transmission for a host of reasons (ranging from physical challenges to pure preference) and this car helps bridge that gap. We had one other auto Bug with an Opel driveline, which went into service in Louisiana to provide a lot of smiles for a collector and his wife. This one is extremely well done, as you can see in the new video below. I’m not sure when and if we will ever have another!

This car is very well-restored with a 1.4 liter Chevette drivetrain and three speed automatic transmission with an electric overdrive fourth speed. The engine has about 52 horsepower, perhaps a bit more since a nice header is installed. Compared to a 43 HP stock 948 Bugeye, the power plant feels more than adequate–not quite as quick as a 1275 Bugeye but quicker than a 948 car.

It was built about 15 years ago in Texas, then sold roughly ten years ago to a couple in Virginia. The odometer currently shows 13,763 miles, and it looks to me that this is the mileage that was put on the car since the restoration over the past 15 years. They used the car regularly without issue. Everything looks quite clean. It is common for restorers to zero out mileage after a massive project such as this one. As with most British cars of this vintage, actual mileage is unknown.

The finish is excellent and shines beautifully. The builder removed the beading strips on the top of the nose and fenders, which always makes Bugeyes look cleaner. This too was very well executed, as was a very smart bonnet lock in the footwells the locks down the flip forward nose.

Footwell floor panels were also replaced during the restoration, thus ensuring a solid underside. An impressive cross brace was also welded under the car, to keep everything strong. You can also see the transmission cooler underneath the car. It’s up out of harms’ way.

The fabricator who built this Sprite did an admirable job fitting the driveline and trimming the cabin. It’s all very clean and well customized. The GM transmission is of course wider than the standard Sprite gearbox, but by removing the battery and heater shelf, everything fits just fine. The transmission tunnel in the cockpit is also slightly wider, and very well executed. The large radiator is clearly up to the task of keeping everything cool, with two substantial electric fans mounted to help when needed. The car drives quite nicely. Front disk brakes are also fit and the stopping power is quite good. Roll bar is nice, as are the quite useable fender mirrors.

Check out the short video above for a more detailed look at the installation and controls. This car is well-sorted and ready to go. Too often, this sort of project is a bit half-baked. But this car was lucky to meet a great builder, who made a very well-modified user-friendly Sprite that has stood-up to the test of almost 15k miles, and seems to be ready for a whole lot more! Note: This car was built in 1959 but is titled as a 1960 model. Many British cars seem to have been titled in the year after their manufacture, perhaps they sat for a winter and were sold the following Spring?

Call or email if you would like to take Scarlett home!

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Bugeye picture of the week-David and Goliath

Photo courtesy James Hodges

Bugeye Sprite cockpit details-windshield gaskets, washer pumps, choke and starter knobs, door pockets…

Details matter, especially in the cockpit, where you spend the most time with your car and where everything has to be right. Too many restorations are only 3/4 baked. We work hard to change that whenever we can, by correcting and detailing the subtle features that help differentiate a good restoration from a great one. In this restoration, you’ll notice overly busy door pocket fasteners (now replaced) and a flat windshield to body gasket, which should be rolled under or it will leak at the windshield wiper posts (done).

In the video below, I show a few of the these subtle details we changed on our newest Bugeye listed called “Kelly.” The sum total of those details can really improve any restoration.

Austin Healey 100 M sorting


We are big Healey lovers too here are Bugeyeguy (I have a BN2 and BJ8 in my personal collection), and this week we had the pleasure of sorting out this stunning 1956 BN2 with an “M” kit. We didn’t build this car, but it was very satisfying to work on the last 20%, to make a great car even better. In particular, we fixed the worn throttle linkage to allow full throttle to be attained, which made the car so much more responsive and quick. It was formerly only getting about half of what was possible, primarily because of lost motion in the worn linkage.

We also fit this nice blue tonneau and removed yet another plastic sinking fuel sender float that was ravaged by ethanol and on it’s way permanently to the bottom of the tank. We fit a metal float, pressure tested the tank, and ensured that it was wells-sealed.

Check out the video below for a tour of this great vehicle (above). We’ll be finished next week with our 1960 BT7 interior restoration, and we’ll post a new video about that project soon. If you have a big Healey that needs sorting, give us a call, we would be happy to help.