Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently FOUR great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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“Booker,” 1960 Bugeye Sprite driver for sale.
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“Sara,” 1959 5-speed Bugeye Sprite for sale
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“Delores,” striking restored 1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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1967 restored MGB with matching original engine and color! New drive video!
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64K mile 1971 Volvo P1800E for sale, overdrive!
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Restored 1968 Morris Mini Cooper S for sale
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Stunning and rare 1969 MGC for sale, new pictures!

How to build a better Bugeye Sprite

This Bugeye came to us in a bunch of boxes. Our job: to mold the contents of these bins and boxes into the ultimate Sprite. Our intention is to leverage everything we have learned, from the 161 Bugeyes that have passed through our workshop, into the construction of a wonderful sportscar.

We stripped the old primer off the tub, mounted it on a rotisserie, and produced the sealed tub you see in the video, coated in Porsche Boxster silver. Next we prepare for disk brakes all around. Then we mount a supercharged 1275 engine mated to a five speed transmission.

The result will be the best Bugeye we have ever built.

Stay tuned for updates.

How to build a gold level concours Austin Healey Bugeye Sprite

We are proud to announce that we attained a gold award in the concours class at the Austin Healey Enclave in Gettysburg, PA this week! Our 1958 Sprite AN5L 552 scored 965.5 points. Gold is awarded for 950-1000 points. This was a huge achievement for us!

Each car starts with 1000 points. Then four judges pour over every nut and bolt on the car for two full hours, deducting points for any imperfection. Owners get to watch and learn, while hoping that the points don’t come off too quickly!

This is the first of a series of posts I’ll share about the event. It took us a year rebuild this car. It was a wonderful restoration, but we had to undo a lot that was done on this car and redo it with concours standards in mind. That meant taking off a lot of accessories that help drivability, but which were not factory correct. It was an arduous process, and we now have a lot to celebrate. This car is now the oldest Gold level concours Sprite in the world. (make sure to click “read more” below the photo to see a short judging video)

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[Read more…]

Barn-Find Bugeye Sprite preservation

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So many old British cars get completely ripped apart, with the intention of blasting, stripping, washing, removing and renewing every last inch. Most people love new, clean, and sterilized… ready for another long run on the open road.

With this particular barn find, however, the owner took a different tack, and hired us to preserve and refresh, without losing the weathered charm. Anyone can strip and paint a car. But to preserve a car’s patina is a different matter.

The mix of old and new is inevitable, and the fine line between the two must be managed carefully. Too mildewed and weathered and no one will want to ride in the car… and too painted and clean means that the car is, like so many other restored cars, perhaps a bit too sterilized.

Meet “Beans,” a 1960 Bugeye we prepared for a discerning collector, who wanted the car faithfully set up just as it was when new– cleaned up, refreshed, renewed, mechanically sorted, but not restored. We started with a remarkably solid car needing only new footwells, which we welded in place. The engine was toast after 40 years of hibernation, so we rebuilt it. We rebuilt the original transmission. Replaced the fuel tank and pump. All the rubber was perished so we replaced it. Shocks and hydraulics were all leaking, and replaced. The original paint was hammered, but we carefully brought it back to life, still weathered, but now with some gloss. Seats were too far gone, so the owner framed them in clear boxes to hang on the wall next to the car, and asked for nice new ones to match the originals.

The result is a great driving and clean one-of-a-kind Bugeye.

Patina perfected.

Austin Healey Bugeyed Sprite, purchased in 1961, restored in 2015. Unveiled after restoration!

Tom and Judith were married in 1961 and honeymooned in this car. What an honor to restore it for them this month, so they can celebrate their next anniversary with their old friend! Tom purchased the car in 1961, had it painted in 1985, and it has sat ever since. We spent three weeks restoring the mechancicals, front end and now 30 year old paint for this wonderful couple, so their their next Bugeye summer could commence!

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Flat-out race car made urban Bugeye warrior

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About one third of our customers have more than one Bugeye Sprite. And so I was not surprised when Bill in California, who already owns a stunning restored Bugeye we prepared for him called “Drusilla,” called to purchase our former racer called “Fletch.” When he said that he wanted to keep it in NYC, that got me quite excited. Of course a Bugeye in The Big Apple is about the worst place for the car, with Sprite-sized potholes, abundant newly licensed taxi drivers and full contact parking. But in this age of custom-ride reality TV shows, why not? We proposed an urban assault package with full body armor and sketched up some Max-max inspired nerf bars. But Bill wanted to keep the car’s clean lines intact. We looked to the sky and asked all NYC parking garages attendants to please be kind to this car. And then we set out to convert this former track car to an urban warrior.

We had already fit new street tires and stock lighting, which we quickly upgraded to full LEDs, for maximum visibility. I was worried that the unlocked fuel cap might invite mischief, so we fit a locking cap, buried under a slick racing flip up assembly. We agreed to leave the interior spartan, to retain the racing heritage, and to keep the interior best suited to a quick wipe out should it get wet. We fit racing lap belts, two points of the racing belts you would have found in this car. We fit a leash on the track-required electrical kill switch on the cowl, so the key could be used for additional anti-theft, but would not be a nuisance if ever misplaced. Next came an air horn, electric cooling fan, air filters and a custom tonneau to keep the dirt, water and prying eyes out of the cockpit. That British vinyl had to be custom-fit around all five roll bar legs. And we also removed the rear tube shocks, too stiff, and hanging low in harm’s way. The original lever shocks were a smart choice for ride quality and ground clearance.

There were multiple mechanical challenges given the rough road ahead… for example, the racing header and exhaust was seemingly designed for maximum volume (and performance) so we fit a great muffler but we also had to keep the header from rattling on the driver footwell. Not a concern in a race car since it only happens at low RPMs. But at traffic lights it was knocking out my fillings. So we cut, welded and bent the pipes and now the car is actually somewhat civilized.

I always wanted a race car, but didn’t want to wait till weekends to enjoy it. Driving this car around the block is like taking a lap around the track, and that’s what makes is so much fun. Bill will have to decide if he wants to keep the close ratio straight cut racing gears. The whine you get with this gear-set is intoxicating but perhaps we’ll put in a five speed transmission later.

We’re all really excited about this project, because we pushed the envelope once again and made a Bugeye for a new mission-specific application. Bill wanted a car he could park in New York City and draw a big crowd, even among the most jaded Manhattanites. Fletch will do this job nicely. Come for a drive with me in the video below!

Bugeye barn-find preservation part 2

IMG_4050 “Beans” has more life in the paint than we had thought! Here’s a shot of the nose during cleaning and restoration of the paint. The problem is the paint is very thin, which you can understand since it’s 55 years old. So we’ll have a shiny old paint job when done, with some imperfections, and next we have to figure out what if any restoration we will do to the most weathered spots.

You can see the original beige color coming back to life on the left side of this photo.