Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently FOUR great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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“Booker,” 1960 Bugeye Sprite driver for sale.
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“Sara,” 1959 5-speed Bugeye Sprite for sale
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“Delores,” striking restored 1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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1967 restored MGB with matching original engine and color! New drive video!
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64K mile 1971 Volvo P1800E for sale, overdrive!
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Restored 1968 Morris Mini Cooper S for sale
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Stunning and rare 1969 MGC for sale, new pictures!

Bugeye Sprite Door Liners for sale!

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Finally! Correct door liners for your Bugeye Sprite!

These ribbed rubber pieces are a wonderful reproduction of the original rubber liners that would have come with a brand new Bugeye, and we are delighted to make them available for anyone who wants the correct finish for the inside of their doors.

At present, these are only available in black, but we have had good luck painting these blue, green or red to match cars of those colors. That said, we have found that the black Mats  look good in bugeyes of all colors.
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We use a high powered contact cement to hold these in place, called “Sta-Put,” but any good glue will work. You’ll need a clean and smooth inner door skin to get good adhesion.

We’ve used dozens of these on the cars we restore and now you can too!

Get your set today by clicking here.

Nine second Bugeye Sprite Engine removal and other impressive feats

We have been practicing and are getting pretty good at removing and installing engines. Our morning warmup is usually to put in an MGB engine with overdrive… something big that puts up a bit of a fight. For a lunchtime “quicky,”, we’ll yank out a Bugeye engine. It’s all in a days’s work as we strive to be the best.

Kidding aside… here is a 67 MGB we have getting a new overdrive transmission, and our silver Bugeye “Dustin” getting a new transmission in preparation for the new owner’s forthcoming 1000 mile drive home!

 

Most worn camshaft ever

We have a 67 MGB in the shop that was making a bigger than normal valve clatter, so we removed the camshaft to investigate and found seriously worn lobes and lifters. Once the tappets get pitted, it’s all over, as they will steadily grind away the lobes of the cam and rob performance and ultimately start to make a lot of noise. In the video below, you can see the extent of the wear. While this video features MGB engine parts, all classic British cars are vulnerable to this problem.

Modern oil no longer has ZDDP added, apparently since late model roller bearings don’t need it and because catalytic converters are damaged by it (thanks Bob for the heads up) and so all classic cars are out of luck. Apparently the zinc makes a protective coating that will reduce wear to the valve train. We are offering zinc additive in a four ounce bottle you should add after every oil change. It’s cheap insurance, and after seeing this camshaft, we are now believers! You can click the “add to cart” button below to order some zinc for your engine, or check out “for sale/accessories,” where you can order zinc and other good stuff. And some racing oils also have zinc added, check the label!


 

Be kind to your Bugeye Sprite gearbox

I love old British transmissions, and their non-synchro first/reverse gears are just not an issue. But I have noticed from riding with a lot of new classic car owners that they sometimes accidentally catch first while shifting from second to third. Grinding is the result. It’s easy to avoid on a 2/3 shift, you simply keep a tad of pressure to the right as you push the lever forward, and the shifter will jump over slightly so it easily aligns with the synchronized third gear.

People also habitually try to engage first gear while sliding through a stop sign, which also results in grinding. The fix is to come to a full stop and engage first. Alternatively, you can roll through while staying in second.

The other cardinal rule is to be gentle with the shifter, and to use light pressure. With good timing, the gear box will almost draw the shifter into gear, instead of the driver applying excessive force. The goal is to shift quickly but gently. Challenge yourself to be 100% grind free.

If it’s grinding, seek help, you’re doing something wrong, or something is wrong with your driveline. If you keep grinding, your gears will (sadly) come to look like what you see in the video below.

We always have rebuilt smooth and ribbed case transmissions in stock, and we can sell you one or install one in your car, but hopefully this post will help keep your gearbox alive and well for generations to come!

61 ways to improve a Bugeye Sprite

We just shipped-in a nice red Bugeye that the owner wanted optimized, and here’s a video that shows the wonderful pile of parts we’ll install to make this nice car superb.

We can do anything to these cars in our building, and while we sometimes make big changes like installing five speed transmissions and superchargers, we are always focused on small changes to make a somewhat squirrelly car a joy to drive once again. Each system will get our attention as we take this “restored” car, and restore it! By tightening up a string of worn components, and upgrading others, this Bugeye will be a joy again for generations.

We are privileged to have become a national service center for these wonderful cars! And if you want one that is ready to go, please check out our current inventory of bugeyes for sale. We’ll post an update soon so you can see this car transform!

Another Bugeye Sprite transformed!

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Here’s what we have been up to… Luigi came to us from Montreal looking good but not optimized, and after roughly 50 improvements, the car is transformed. Like most Bugeyes (and old British cars in general) there are issues that have not been addressed over the years, and we are getting quite good at sorting them out after the 140 Bugeyes that have passed through our door. It’s a constantly evolving process as we learn from every failure in the field, and push towards perfection. It’s never easy, since we are dealing with more than 50 year old pieces, and often new parts that are inferior. It’s a dance of blending old and new with a lot of fabrication and innovation, all to keep these cars on the road and working beautifully. We’re not perfect, but every car teaches us how to make these cars better than ever.

Take Luigi’s carbs for example… we could see that the front and rear jets were set at radically different heights, and even though the car ran reasonably well, we knew that the asymmetry was a clue that we could do better. Upon disassembly, we discovered that the float jets were mismatched, the carb springs were uneven and mismatched and the float levels were different. We rebuilt everything with rich needles which seem to work better with today’s ethanol fuel, and the car now runs far better with much improved throttle response.

And that’s just one system that we improved… when each system on the car is optimized, the driving experience becomes pure bliss. Lots of Bugeyes are tentative when we get them (especially ebay cars), feeling somewhat loose and unstable. Luigi’s owner and I tossed the car around a bit in the parking lot to demonstrate that the car is now solid and tight, and the resulting driver confidence is what makes these cars so much fun to drive.

We also transformed the cosmetics on this car, by wet sanding the entire exterior to bring the paint back to life. You can see the before picture above as Luigi gets striped of his former orange peel. This work too must be done really carefully because burn through is a constant risk. But the final result is a deep shine for great looks and great performance.

Whether you buy one of our cars (we have six for sale at present, see “current inventory” in the right margin) or you send your car to our facility for transformation, we strive to make these cars into blissful little machines.