Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently TWO great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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“Booker,” 1960 Bugeye Sprite driver for sale.
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1959 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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1973 TR6 for sale, excellent driver, thousands spent on restoration!
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64K mile 1971 Volvo P1800E for sale, overdrive!
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Stunning 1969 MGC for sale, original colors, matching engine, low mileage, new video!

The last 20%


This project typifies the value we add to the fleet of Bugeyes roaming the planet worldwide.

Our goal is to get these cars to 100%. This matters. We are dealing with old technology. And old worn parts. And sometimes, sub-standard new reproduction parts. Sometimes it seems like nothing is working in harmony, and after driving more than 200 of these cars, we can tell when everything is working right. The reward is a car that is blissful to drive.

I know that many Bugeye drivers have not experienced a fully sorted car. I know this because I have had too many customers tell me “I thought it was supposed to drive that way!” No. These car are tight, spirited and a lot fun when they are set-up properly.

Back to this nice car– it came in this week from New Jersey for service plus mechanical and cosmetic upgrades.

We added a sway bar for better handling and less bodyroll, as well as footwell threshold covers for a nicer cockpit. We installed a custom Lempert steering wheel made from Brazilian tiger wood. We fit a spin-on oil filter kit for easier service.

The rear drums were scraping the brake backplates on hard cornering, so we ground off the excess material to make cornering that much more fun. Because of a non-working odometer, we replaced the speedo with a rebuilt unit. The fuel gauge was not reading below half, so we removed the sender only to find a swollen plastic float which we replaced with a metal one. The fuel tank pick up was also missing, which effectively reduced the capacity of this tank to just 3.6 gallons. We fixed that, put in the proper strainer pickup, changed the fuel filter and put it all back together. Now the owner can get a more accurate sense of how much fuel is left in the tank, with a working fuel gauge and odometer.

When all this was done, I still wasn’t quite happy with the rear suspension. I have driven 200 Bugeyes over the same bump in our street, and I can tell by the note that emanates from the boot how we are doing with every bump. In the case of this car, the rear thump over our local hump meant we needed to disconnect the rear shocks and evaluate their condition. Turns out the shocks were weak and the rear dog bones were worn. Once we replaced all that, only then was this car ready to be sent home. (many Sprites need this, so we offer rear suspension rehab kit, linked below).

It’s very satisfying for us to extract that last little bit out of these cars, to make them a joy to drive and enjoy, and to help our owners to have that much more fun! “More sure-footed than ever,” reports the owner.

And that, is the the result of sorting the last 20%.

To purchase any of the items we used on this car, click here.

Bugeye Sprite Door Liners for sale!

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Finally! Correct door liners for your Bugeye Sprite!

These ribbed rubber pieces are a wonderful reproduction of the original rubber liners that would have come with a brand new Bugeye, and we are delighted to make them available for anyone who wants the correct finish for the inside of their doors.

At present, these are only available in black, but we have had good luck painting these blue, green or red to match cars of those colors. That said, we have found that the black Mats  look good in bugeyes of all colors.
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We use a high powered contact cement to hold these in place, called “Sta-Put,” but any good glue will work. You’ll need a clean and smooth inner door skin to get good adhesion.

We’ve used dozens of these on the cars we restore and now you can too!

Get your set today by clicking here.

Nine second Bugeye Sprite Engine removal and other impressive feats

We have been practicing and are getting pretty good at removing and installing engines. Our morning warmup is usually to put in an MGB engine with overdrive… something big that puts up a bit of a fight. For a lunchtime “quicky,”, we’ll yank out a Bugeye engine. It’s all in a days’s work as we strive to be the best.

Kidding aside… here is a 67 MGB we have getting a new overdrive transmission, and our silver Bugeye “Dustin” getting a new transmission in preparation for the new owner’s forthcoming 1000 mile drive home!

 

Most worn camshaft ever

We have a 67 MGB in the shop that was making a bigger than normal valve clatter, so we removed the camshaft to investigate and found seriously worn lobes and lifters. Once the tappets get pitted, it’s all over, as they will steadily grind away the lobes of the cam and rob performance and ultimately start to make a lot of noise. In the video below, you can see the extent of the wear. While this video features MGB engine parts, all classic British cars are vulnerable to this problem.

Modern oil no longer has ZDDP added, apparently since late model roller bearings don’t need it and because catalytic converters are damaged by it (thanks Bob for the heads up) and so all classic cars are out of luck. Apparently the zinc makes a protective coating that will reduce wear to the valve train. We are offering zinc additive in a four ounce bottle you should add after every oil change. It’s cheap insurance, and after seeing this camshaft, we are now believers! You can click the “add to cart” button below to order some zinc for your engine, or check out “for sale/accessories,” where you can order zinc and other good stuff. And some racing oils also have zinc added, check the label!


 

Be kind to your Bugeye Sprite gearbox

I love old British transmissions, and their non-synchro first/reverse gears are just not an issue. But I have noticed from riding with a lot of new classic car owners that they sometimes accidentally catch first while shifting from second to third. Grinding is the result. It’s easy to avoid on a 2/3 shift, you simply keep a tad of pressure to the right as you push the lever forward, and the shifter will jump over slightly so it easily aligns with the synchronized third gear.

People also habitually try to engage first gear while sliding through a stop sign, which also results in grinding. The fix is to come to a full stop and engage first. Alternatively, you can roll through while staying in second.

The other cardinal rule is to be gentle with the shifter, and to use light pressure. With good timing, the gear box will almost draw the shifter into gear, instead of the driver applying excessive force. The goal is to shift quickly but gently. Challenge yourself to be 100% grind free.

If it’s grinding, seek help, you’re doing something wrong, or something is wrong with your driveline. If you keep grinding, your gears will (sadly) come to look like what you see in the video below.

We always have rebuilt smooth and ribbed case transmissions in stock, and we can sell you one or install one in your car, but hopefully this post will help keep your gearbox alive and well for generations to come!

61 ways to improve a Bugeye Sprite

We just shipped-in a nice red Bugeye that the owner wanted optimized, and here’s a video that shows the wonderful pile of parts we’ll install to make this nice car superb.

We can do anything to these cars in our building, and while we sometimes make big changes like installing five speed transmissions and superchargers, we are always focused on small changes to make a somewhat squirrelly car a joy to drive once again. Each system will get our attention as we take this “restored” car, and restore it! By tightening up a string of worn components, and upgrading others, this Bugeye will be a joy again for generations.

We are privileged to have become a national service center for these wonderful cars! And if you want one that is ready to go, please check out our current inventory of bugeyes for sale. We’ll post an update soon so you can see this car transform!