Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently NINE great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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1958 Excellent Restored Leaf Green 1275 Bugeye Sprite for sale, “Luigi!”
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1959 Austin Healey Sprite, restored with automatic transmission! NEW VIDEO Test drive!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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1959 Bugeye Sprite For sale: Best of the Best!
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1959 Custom 5-speed Austin Healey Bugeye Sprite for sale!
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1959 Restored Bugeye Sprite for sale- VIDEO @ 70MPH! Five-speed, 1275 engine, disc brakes, wire wheels and more!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite driving project for sale!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale-The Bees Knees!
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1960 Bugeye Sprite for sale, exceptional and beautifully restored!
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1974 MGB GT for sale- One of the best values in classic cars today!
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1978 911 SC Targa for sale with 65k miles!
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Excellent 1960 Austin Healey 3000 Mark 1 BT7 for sale

How to properly fuel a classic car

I am constantly surprised to see classic cars with paint damage beneath their fuel filler neck. Gasoline is corrosive and you don’t want to get any on your paint if you can avoid it. So I made a fuel-fill video below so you can see my technique to prevent fuel from spilling.

First off, self-service fueling is required. I would never leave this to a stranger so full service is very high risk. In fact, I  have seen several cars with fuel nozzle scrapes near the fuel fill. Some people just aren’t very careful when they are swinging the spout!

Secondly, topping off these old cars is risky. If you overfill the car and then park it in the sun, the vented caps will bleed fuel out of the tank and perhaps onto your paint. Sometimes filler necks leak onto the top of the fuel tank, which never smells good. So try to stop filling about a half gallon from the very top. That leaves some room for expansion. I believe the photo above is damage from heat expansion overflow. So if you overfill, make sure to burn some fuel before you park the car in the sun!

And finally, try not to move the nozzle out of your tank before the fuel has drained out, that way, you won’t drag a few drops onto the paint and cause damage!