Inventory for sale is listed below

Currently EIGHT great prepared Bugeyes are in stock and ready for delivery to your door!

Other great classics too!

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1958 Excellent Restored Leaf Green 1275 Bugeye Sprite for sale, “Luigi!”
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1959 Austin Healey Sprite, restored with automatic transmission!
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1959 Custom 5-speed Austin Healey Bugeye Sprite for sale!
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1959 Restored Bugeye Sprite for sale-with overdrive five-speed, 1275 engine, disc brakes, wire wheels and more!
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59 Bugeye Sprite driver with period Kellison nose!
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60 Bugeye Sprite driver for sale, “Booker”
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Excellent 1960 Bugeye Sprite driver for sale!
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For sale: One 1959 Bugeye Sprite in a bubble

Bugeyeguy on CarsYeah!

I am honored this week to join the roster of car lovers with archived interviews in the CarsYeah audio library. Give this one a listen, I share a bunch of history about the evolution of our business, and much of this discussion has not been previously recorded anywhere else. Click here to listen to the podcast.

Check out the library of recordings, there are many great auto-interviews at this website.

1958 Excellent Restored Leaf Green 1275 Bugeye Sprite for sale, “Luigi!”

This is “Luigi,” (AN5L 3057). The car is fully restored and ready for a new owner. It’s a really nice car and it drives great. 1958 Bugeyes are the most rare and have a few unique features you don’t find on the later models.

This is an early thin windshield 1958 car, about the 2500th made (of about 50,000). Notice the factory gusset in the rocker panel at the “B” pilar, and the early style windshield wiper motor top, visible under the bonnet. These are all rare features original to the early ’58 Bugeyes. Windshield frames changed at car #5277, and the fatter frame continued through the end of the production run. Early cars are getting more and more rare. Thus, Luigi is a very special Bugeye!
The car was named Luigi by “Perry,” the former owner, pictured here. He has lovingly cared for this car during his ownership since 2012. The car was completely restored in about 1985 in Alberta, Canada. Receipts are included for the engine rebuild at that time. In fact, there is a large book full of receipts from both recent owners. Perry brought the car to our shop from his home in Montreal for a major service a few years ago, and he drove the car less than 200 miles since. While he loved the car, he decided to sell it so someone else can enjoy it. The new speedo we installed a few years back now reads just 161 miles. It doesn’t look like the car has traveled many miles at all since the ground-up restoration years ago.

The underside is solid and quite clean and the car is still very sharp.

The car features a strong 1275 12V engine, from a later Sprite or Midget, with many upgrades, including lifetime K and N air filters and better (bigger) HS2 1.25 inch carburettors. It also has an electric fuel pump, auxiliary electric cooling fan mounted in the nose, exhaust header, fuel pressure regulator and coolant overflow reservoir to help keep air out of the cooling system. The electric cooling fan has a switch under the dash board as shown in the photos. There is a nice tonneau included (see picture) as well as new side curtains and a good top.

The interior is leather, the finish is excellent and the car drives beautifully–everything works. We just changed the front brake wheel cylinders to service the brake system. I have driven this car quite a bit and it is ready to go.

If you are wondering about the white reflective cap on the passenger side of the engine bay, it’s just a spray can cap over the fuse box. It’s not something you need, but it’s a nice way to store some reflective tape under the hood. I suspect Perry thought it might keep some moisture off the fuses.

The yellow “Frogari” stickers on the A pillars look great and will come off easily if the new owner desires. They are not hiding anything and were put there strictly for decoration. We should also be able to remove the Calgary event plaque on the dashboard if the new owner prefers (the car was restored in Calgary before Perry bought it). We can work out any cosmetic revisions with the new owner, but the car looks great as it sits. Another nice cosmetic (non-stock) touch is the chrome wheel trim rings.

Cheers Perry! Thanks for taking such good care of this great Frogeye!

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“Rescue Me” Bugeye rescued

Remember the “Rescue” Bugeye buried in the weeds? Here you can see the car at it’s new home, safely in a new garage in Virginia. We almost lost this one to the crusher, and it’s actually a sound car with great potential. We’re excited that we could remotely facilitate another Bugeye revival.

This leaf green ’59 Sprite was plucked from the weeds in Grand Junction, Colorado and winched onto a trailer for delivery to Kevin in Virginia, the proud new owner. The car initially looked pretty sad in the small picture at left, but the potential is clear now that the car has been extracted. If you are unfamiliar, normally, a car stored in this manner would have the rocker panel and rear fender bottoms completely rusted away.

This car has not run since the 80s, but how delightful to see the rocker panel and fender bottoms so intact, even after a prolonged hibernation outside. The floors turned out to be quite good too. Thankfully, the dry Southwest helped keep this excellent restoration candidate alive. And thanks to Paul, the prior owner, who preserved this car and offered it to me so that we could find it a new home and ultimately get it back on the road!

Bugeyeguy Evolution

The cars just keep on lining-up.



And so, after extensive dialogue with Bodhi regarding this situation, we have decided to expand. He assured me that digging, while messy, always produces great results.

During the past six months we have completely ripped-apart our nice little back yard with progress in mind. More space creates lots of new opportunities, and we are on the case.
In this photo album below, you can see how we took out a few trees, leveled the property, poured the footings, installed radiant heat, poured the slab, and now, throughout the month of October, we will be erecting the new structure. Our new corrugated steel arched building will tuck behind our 1951 Quonset hut. Throughout the fall, we will be fitting out this new facility with even better resources to serve our customers.

We’ll have more lifts, more storage and more efficient work space, all of which will help us to do an even better job. We’ve already completed our new rear staircase, which helps us access our giant parts inventory faster, directly from the shop floor.

Thanks to all of you for your support: for helping us place more than 200 Bugeyes in new homes, for choosing us to be your parts supplier, for trusting us to sort out and make-wonderful your sports cars. Thanks to our incredible staff for embracing challenges on a daily basis. Thanks to (sports car lover) Jeff Hoover of Tappe Architects for helping us figure out what goes where.


And a special thanks to you, for being the best customers in the classic car universe!

Bugeye picture of the week-David and Goliath

Photo courtesy James Hodges

Bugeye Sprite Stowe British Invasion recap

When making a 500 mile roundtrip at a good clip in a five-speed Bugeye Sprite, a chopped windshield is not recommended. It looks really cool, and attracts a lot of attention. But on the interstate highway, the short windshield makes for a windy and noisy trip. It’s better suited for around-town use. I had four hours each way to ponder this reality, on my recent highway trip to Stowe, Vermont to the British Invasion car show.

I tried a few different methods to keep down the highway wind noise… first, my motorcycle helmet… which was entertaining, but a bit hot.

Next my thick ear flaps hat… effective, but also hot. I supplemented this hat with my Bugeye hoodie. And Bose noise canceling ear buds. This set-up kept the noise under control. And allowed me to enjoy the ride in this very highway-capable Bugeye, built with a 5-speed transmission and 3.9 rear end.

Each year, a long highway trip in a classic car seems to become more and more of an anomaly. 97% of the cars I passed on this recent trip had closed windows and sealed-up occupants. Window tinting only seems to keep the people further apart. I like the highway better when we all have a chance for connection with all the other travelers. My highway would have mandatory elbows hanging out of pickup trucks, and vacation-bound station wagons with mom and dad up front, and a pile of kids waving from the way back, giggling after throwing a kiss. Cars on highways today feel more like mobile Darth Vaders, Every smiling Bugeye on the road helps feed the resistance.

This green Bugeye “Gumby” has been with me since 1979. When I got the car it was just 20 years old. Now, as Bugeyes approach their 60th birthday, the contrast is more dramatic. The car is more unfamiliar, yet it still retains universal appeal. But what seems so different today is the consciousness (or lack thereof) of drivers out on the open road. A Bugeye trip activates all of one’s senses. Modern cars seem to mute them. And who can blame us– there is something quite pleasant about the climate-controlled quiet envelope with great entertainment and computer-managed cruise control in a vehicle that you are pretty certain can make it to your destination… and back again!

There were about 500 British cars at the British Invasion and how nice to be with this family, all people who get it, and who understand the difference between motoring in a classic car, and sealing oneself in a tomb.


Perhaps this is how it looks as a culture streams toward life with autonomous cars. Comfort and convenience take control. The personality of our vehicles and the experience of driving come second. I hope that our growing fleet well-working Bugeyes can help change this, at least for those people looking for this sort of adventure. This is one reason I made this 500 mile pilgrimage… to demonstrate that one can travel in these old cars, and travel well.

Only one thing broke on this 500 mile test drive-the fuse that feeds the headlight relay blew, which made things pretty dark on Saturday night. I pulled into a motel parking lot on the Stowe mountain road and started to climb around under the dash to diagnose the problem and realized that with 6 miles to go to my B & B and its superb new cedar garage (pictured above), my LED bicycle headlight would do the job just fine, so I held this powerful flashlight on top of the windscreen and made the short drive home (it’s probably brighter than the working two headlights). We’ll find and fix the short when we have more time here at the shop.

By the way, we won first place.